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High plains soul

March 16, 2010

I first laid eyes on the High Plains Ecoregion after driving westward into clouds all day. Just at sunset, the clouds broke. The quality of the greenish-gold sunlight spilling over the ranchlands dazzled me. The low-angled light of the setting sun made the landscape pulse with energy before sliding the stillness of night. It reminded me of the energy I always feel in autumn before sliding into the dormancy of winter.

I love living here in big sky country. Most folks would think I live in Montana when I say that, but they’re wrong. The sky here in Wyobraska is just as big and just as deserving of the name.

Something stirs inside me when I drive outside of town, out on the rolling plains.

I would be content to sit for hours and drink in the texture of winter-bare wheatfields against a gray early-spring sky.

There’s something spiritual about the vastness and stillness of the landscape here. With no other visual stimuli to interrupt the conjunction of earth and sky, the scenery fuses into a whole, and then it’s just tiny little me out there, an insignificant dot on the plains. Sometimes, I feel myself merging into that landscape, the enormity of the world undifferentiated from the boundaries of my body, save for a still, small spark.

I am a high plains soul.

Copright 2010 by Katie Bradshaw

7 Comments leave one →
  1. March 16, 2010 9:59 am

    Very moving!
    Nature always was, is and shall forever be our most tangible spiritual connection!

  2. March 16, 2010 10:01 am

    Marvelous words, sentiments, feelings, photos!
    Says a lot about you and the depths of who you are!

  3. March 17, 2010 9:16 am

    Amazing photos–thanks for sharing.

    • Katie Bradshaw permalink*
      March 17, 2010 11:45 am

      Thanks for commenting. Not bad for “car window pix”, eh? (For the record, I wasn’t driving when I took them.)

  4. Sue Mommy permalink
    March 17, 2010 8:39 pm

    Beautiful, it brought a tear to my eye………to both eyes.

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